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From the Inside Out
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It's Prime Hurricane Season Time

Posted By Jeff Dover, CRFP, RFMA, Wednesday, August 14, 2019
Updated: Friday, August 9, 2019

Hello RFMA members,

The prime hurricane seasonal time is here. This would be a good time to review your Disaster Management Plan with other internal departments to ensure all bases are covered so everyone knows what to expect and do in preparation, and during a storm. When was the last time the plan was reviewed and discussed? Following are a few items that may need review:

- Planning. Are the stores employees ready and informed on what actions are required in planning for a storm event? Does everyone know what to do and when to do it? What about corporate personnel?

- Decision making. Who is responsible for the critical decisions and when? What are the critical decisions? When should stores close to keep employees safe? When should contractors be notified and set-up to board and/or prepare the restaurant for the storm?

- Communication timing. Who is responsible to communicate the decisions reached? Are the disaster communication devices available and ready, i.e., satellite phones, 2-way radios, etc.?

- Store supplies. Are the proper supplies and their quantities available or are additional items needed, i.e., flash lights, batteries, First Aid kit, drinking water, phone chargers, cash, generators, etc.?

- Recovery. Are the Response and Recovery parts of the plans on target? Are the local public officials contact information up to date and written down which will be needed in reopening the restaurant.

- Insurance. Is your coverage up to date, active, and include all potential disasters, i.e. hurricane, flood, fire, etc?

Hurricanes are just one of the natural disasters to plan for. Periodic practice and review of your plans are necessary to protect company assets and keep employees safe. RFMA has several Disaster Management planning resources on our website in the Resource Library in the Facilities Toolkit section and there is an Online Learning Module in our CRFP Prep Course. Additionally, feel free to review past articles in the Facilitator magazine.

Dover and out.



Jeff Dover, CRFP 
Facilities Resource Manager | Restaurant Facility Management Association 
jeff@rfmaonline.com
972-805-0905 ext. 3

Tags:  disaster management  Hurricanes  restaurant emergencies 

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Hurricane Season Ending Soon

Posted By Jeff Dover, CRFP, RFMA, Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Hello RFMA members,

The hurricane season is coming to a close but the chances still remain for a storm to hit during the next few months. Thus might be a good time to review your Disaster Management Plan with other internal departments and make adjustments as necessary. All plans are living, breathing documents that need review and updates from time to time. Restaurant facility professionals are looked at to lead in protecting local stores (assets) and may be asked to initiate a complete review of current disaster management plans. Some items to look at are as follows:

- Planning. Are the stores employees ready and informed on how to plan for a storm event? Does everyone know what to do and when to do it? What about corporate personnel?

- Decision making. Who is responsible for the critical decisions and when? What are the critical decisions? When should stores close to keep employees safe? When should contractors be notified an set-up to board and/or prepare the restaurant for the storm? These are just a few of the critical questions.

- Communication timing. Who is responsible to communicate the decisions reached? Are the disaster communication devices available and ready, i.e., satellite phones, 2-way radios, etc.?

- Store supplies. Are the proper supplies and their quantities available or are additional items needed, i.e., flash lights, batteries, First Aid kit, drinking water, phone chargers, cash, generators, etc.?

- Recovery. Are the Response and Recovery parts of the plans on target? Are the local public officials contact information up to date and written down which may be needed in reopening the restaurant.

- Insurance. Is your coverage up to date, active, and include all potential disasters, i.e. hurricane, flood, fire, etc?

Hurricanes are just one of the natural disasters to plan for. Periodic practice and review of your plans are necessary to protect company assets and keep employees safe. RFMA has several Disaster Management planning resources on our website in the Resource Library in the Facilities Toolkit section and there is an Online Learning Module in our CRFP Prep Course. Additionally feel free to review past articles in the Facilitator magazine.

Dover and out.



Jeff Dover, CRFP 
Facilities Resource Manager | Restaurant Facility Management Association 
jeff@rfmaonline.com
972-805-0905 ext. 3

 

 

Tags:  disaster follow-up  disaster management planning  fires  floods  hurricanes 

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Disaster Management Review

Posted By Jeff Dover, CRFP, RFMA, Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Updated: Monday, October 10, 2016

Hello RFMA members,

Hurricane Matthew is now behind us but it's devastation isn't. Your efforts are probably still concentrated on getting your facilities repaired, cleaned up, and back open. Hopefully your fellow store employees got thru the storm safe and unit damage was minimal. How did your Disaster Management procedures work? In a few weeks, it may be a good time to meet with other internal departments to review what went well and what did not. Every disaster presents different, difficult challenges and decisions. Restaurant facility professionals are looked at to lead in protecting local stores (assets) and they may be asked to initiate a complete review of current disaster management plans. Some items and a brief review review are as follows:

- Planning, how was the overall plan and what input is needed for a better response in the future?

- On site store procedures, was the written portion of store procedures satisfactory? Were utilities turned off? Did unit restaurant managers know who to contact and when?

- Decision making, were the critical decisions made in a timely, safe manner and by the proper, designated individuals? Were the stores closed early enough to keep employees safe and protect company assets?

- Communication, was it timely? Were the responsible parties able to communicate? Are other forms of communication needed, i.e., satellite phones, 2-way radios, etc.?

- Store supplies, were the proper supplies and their quantities enough or are additional needed, i.e., flash lights, batteries, First Aid kit, drinking water, phone chargers, generators, etc.?

- Contractors and boarding up materials, were shutters and/or plywood available and contractors ready to install? Did they have enough time to install?

- Recovery, were the Response and Recovery parts of the plans on target? Were local public officials contacted and included in reopening the restaurant?

- Insurance, was your company properly protected by the correct insurance coverage? What, if any, changes may be needed?

Hurricanes are just one of the natural disasters to plan for. Periodic practice and review of your plans are necessary to protect company assets and keep employees safe. RFMA has several Disaster Management planning resources on our website in the Resource Library in the Facilities Toolkit section and there is an Online Learning Module in our CRFP Prep Course. Additionally feel free to review past articles in the Facilitator magazine.

Let me know how your plans went.

Dover and out.

 

 

 


Tags:  boarding up restaurants  Disaster Management  hurricanes  insurance 

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Disaster Planning

Posted By Jeff Dover, CRFP, RFMA, Wednesday, June 8, 2016
Updated: Monday, May 23, 2016

Hello RFMA members,

It's early June and officially the hurricane season has started. It began June 1st and ends on November 30th. Are your coastal restaurants prepared? What about the other natural disasters like floods, fires, tornado's, and power outages. Is your Disaster Plan ready and up to date? Has it been reviewed and practiced? Has a plan been developed? Unfortunately, disasters will happen in your stores and the planning stage is the most important part for protecting the employees, customers, and company assets. The plan needs to be in place to minimize the decision time required before, during, and after the event. Obviously, this blog cannot cover all the requirements for proper planning but can provide a few items to consider for your plan. A comprehensive plan will cover the four areas:

- How to prepare

- Minimizing the effects

- Response

- Recovery

Preparing positions your facilities to handle the event by having protection supplies like shutters, plywood, generators, and contractors lined up ready to act. Flash lights, drinking water, first aid kits, 2-way radios, extra cellphone batteries, and spare cash also will come in handy. All great plans will need the input of several internal departments like Operations, Legal, Food Safety, Facilities, etc. The Response and Recovery sections should include who makes on the ground decisions as supplies should already be in place. Prior discussions with local public food safety officials should also be considered as this is a huge potential liability. Obviously the goal is to reopen ASAP as along as the food, facilities, employees and customers are safe.

The plan needs to be practiced periodically to familiarize everyone what is exactly is expected. It can then be revised accordingly. It remains a "living, breathing, document". Also ensure your company has the proper insurance protection as some polices do not include flood or earthquake damage.

There is a large amount of Disaster Management resources available on our website in the Resource Library in the Facilities Toolkit section and there is a Disaster Management Online Learning Module in our CRFP Prep Course. Additionally, check out some of our past Disaster Management articles in Facilitator listed below. Two additional articles will be featured in our upcoming  June/July Facilitator magazine.

Click here to view our Facilitator article: Repairs & Maintenance: Forming a Crisis Management Plan
By: Bill Schaphorst with JC Gonzalez and MaryAnn Velez contributing

Click here to view our Facilitator article: Facility Manager Project Profile: Disaster Preparedness Planning
By: Charlie Hartmann

Dover and out.

Tags:  disaster planning  floods  generators  hurricanes 

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